Archives for posts with tag: online

A look into the growing trend towards online tv channels

By Lory Martinez

YOUTUBE TV

Youtube, a site whose content varies from cat videos to educational how-to clips, will now be charging for subscriptions to some of the most exclusive channels it hosts .

This is in light of the current popularity of online streaming streaming sites such as HuluPlus and Projectfreetv.

I mean, as a college student, I might have a shared television set in my suite’s common area, but when I think about how much it’s actually used for watching TV shows, it’s kind of useless.  My suitemates and I use our TV as an external display for our laptops. I know others who use their Xboxes to stream Netflix. Even Netflix has added its own series of straight-to-online shows such as “House of Cards,” to join the growing trend toward instant web content.

It seems to be a very different world for programming these days. Gone are the days when you had to be home at exactly 8 p.m. each night to catch your favorite shows in prime-time.  Now that users can access so much of  that same content online, they don’t need their tv sets as much.

But when you can see your favorite shows and videos online, where does the revenue come from?

Enter Youtube subscriptions which allow creators of content from exclusive youtube channels of live networks like National Geographic  to expand thier audience online, at a small price.

Only time will tell if this well end up being better or worse for content creators, who could benefit or suffer from the fees to be put in place.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A look into how LinkedIn works

Image representing LinkedIn as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

By Alex Baer

LinkedIn recently celebrated its 10th birthday last Sunday. LinkedIn, sometimes referred to as “the Facebook of networking,” allows people to network with those they have worked with before, or those they would like to work with in the future.

It also allows users to build an online resume, easily accessible to potential recruiters. There is also a premium account offered. Users can pay for a different facet of LinkedIn: Business, for business professionals, Talent for recruiters, JobSeeker for the unemployed (or the curious employed), andSales for sales professionals. There are over 200 million LinkedIn users worldwide.

In July 2011, LinkedIn launched a new feature to the website: posting job openings directly on their website, and allowing users to apply from LinkedIn, linking their LinkedIn resume to their application.

Forbes once called it  “far and away, the most advantageous social networking tool available to job seekers and business professionals today.”

But enough with all the glitz and glamour. What does the data say? Perfect data is a little hard to find, as LinkedIn hasn’t traditionally published much about hiring statistics. Let’s parse through what we can:

-Back in 2010, a report was released that found that 50% of Fortune 500 Companies use LinkedIn.

-LinkedIn gets almost six times the number of job views than Twitter, and almost 12 times that of Facebook. LinkedIn also gets more than 8 times the job applications than Facebook, and 3 times more than Twitter.

Roughly half of LinkedIn users have anywhere from 0 to 500 1st degree connections, but the average LinkedIn recruiter has around 616, and 28% of LinkedIn recruiters have over a thousand connections!

-Of recruiters who use social networks to find potential employees, 48% use only LinkedIn, but only 1% solely use Facebook or Twitter.

-Potential growth is also a factor in networking. To double one’s network on Twitter, it takes only 2.7 months, or roughly 81 days.For LinkedIn, 7.6 months. For Facebook, a whopping 33.9 months (or just under three years).

– Traditionally, the most successful job postings and hirings seem to be sales. As of August 2011, there were about 6.1 million active members on LinkedIn who identified as working in sales. Academics, administrators, engineers, and IT specialists trail in the 4 to 5 million range.

-LinkedIn does have a number of immediately obvious advantages over Facebook and Twitter; namely, no teenage-angst, there’s little spam (as users are trying to create a likable persona), no vague relationship statuses, no birthdays to remember, changes to the user interface are fluid and appealing, but, most importantly, no Pokes.

-It also would appear to lend itself very well to the newest generation of job hunters: us. Having grown up with social networking as much a part of our lives as the duck and cover method was to the Baby Boomers. Sure, for every suave, future New Yorker columnist, there are half a dozen duck-facers, but growing up with “the game” from AOL Instant Messenger to Google Plus, but we seem to have a distinct advantage over the previous generation. As we mature, we learn how to conduct ourselves in the “real world,” but we also draw upon what we have learned.

A look into Cybersecurity in light of the most recent security breaches on Twitter

by Alex Baer

credit: pehub.com

“Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barack Obama is injured.”

It took less than half of a 140-character tweet for a mischievous hacker to send major news outlets scrambling, stocks plummeting, and just plain make a mess last Tuesday. Rest assured, the leader of the free world is alive and well, minus some on-the-job stress, the New York Stock Exchange has largely rebounded to where it was before the tweet, and the Associated Press has regained control of the account.

With that, cybersecurity is no longer a curiosity for Wired, the butt of a joke on Facebook, or the basis of a scene from a Christopher Nolan Batman movie- it’s in everyone’s mind, and its intent comes across as downright malicious. Hacking is nothing new; it took off in the early 80s, and hasn’t slowed down much since then. It certainly lends itself well to simple pranking, political activism and even high-level military operations (read up on the Stuxnet worm- which we haven’t the time for- as it’s a fascinating read!).

Attacks like the one that befell the Associated Press Twitter account, unfortunately, are starting to become more and more common. Back in May 2011, hackers took control of PBS Online, and published a report stating that Tupac had been found “alive and well” in New Zealand. British tabloid The Sun was hacked a few months later by hacker group Lulzsec; their home page read that media mogul Rupert Murdoch had been found dead of an apparent drug overdose.

The Syrian Electronic Army has claimed responsibility for the attack, tweeting from the @AP_Mobile Twitter handle that “Syrian Electronic Army was here.” The SEA also appears to have included other big media accounts in what seems to be a coordinated attack, not the least of which is British newspaper giant The Guardian. Both the Twitter account for CBS’ 60 Minutes and CBS Denver were hacked, and tweeted statements supporting the Assad regime in Syria, criticizing Obama for “trying to take away your guns” and supporting “terrorist” rebels.

Twitter has announced that they are working on a two part authentication system to solve their hacking woes, but have yet to release it to the public. In a statement released a few days ago, Twitter warns “We believe that these attacks will continue, and that news and media organizations will continue to be high value targets to hackers.” Later on in the memo, Twitter also urges its users to take necessary precautions with their cybersecurity.

Though it might just seem like a bunch of hot air, or the same BS you’ve heard many times before,  it really goes to show that

we really don’t do enough to stay safe online. No, I’m not talking about locking up your computer cabinet, or resetting every one of your passwords… though the latter might be the case if you still use “password1” to log in to Facebook. Don’t send your password to anybody online; do it in person, or with a paper trail if you need to.

University of Maryland to Offer Four Free Cour...

University of Maryland to Offer Four Free Courses Through Coursera (Photo credit: University of Maryland Press Releases)

A look into learning in 2013

By Alex Baer

Lenny Scaletta once famously asked, “What’s a mook?” To the fellas of Mean Streets, a “mook” is a loser or a schlub. But for many of us in 2013, “MOOCs” could be a saving grace.

What’s a “MOOC”, you ask? It stands for Massively Open Online Course, and is the newest addition to the e-learning community. In addition to providing assignments, readings, and videos, as in traditional distance education, MOOCs also offer open forums for interaction between students. Unlike online courses offered through a university, MOOCs are free, and open to anyone with Internet access.

Within the past year, MOOCs have skyrocketed in popularity. Coursera, whose founding happened just over a year ago, has over 3 million students, up from 1.7 million in November. Offering courses from over 30 universities from across the nation, including Duke, Columbia, and Princeton- Coursera’s clout grows stronger with each passing “semester”. My personal favorite is Canine Theriogenology for Dog Enthusiasts.

The SUNY system is also unveiling a new e-learning system. Dubbed “Open SUNY,” all online courses within the State University of New York system will be available to all of SUNY’s 468,000 students. Open SUNY is a drastically different system compared to its contemporaries, as it is not only built upon an existing public higher education network, it is also held to the same standards of that institution.

There are many benefits to a MOOC; as it is online, time zones and physical distances lose importance, learning happens in an informal environment, and you don’t need a degree. However, completion rates are usually incredibly low. Many courses see a sharp decline in student participation within the first week. Duke University knows this problem firsthand. In their first offered MOOC, “Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach,” almost 13,000 students registered. Just over half of those who registered watched at least one video, and only 346 students even attempted the final exam.

Not only do MOOCs suffer from the more frivolous types of academics, their very nature is proving to be a bit of a detriment. Although the Internet is the great equalizer of our day, making all users into potential MOOC students, it could also mask those who may not be completely ready for the level of work. As Coursera relies on students to grade one another, the grade you get from the single Mom in Portland might not be the same grade you would have gotten from that 17-year-old from Arlington.

In addition to MOOCs, there are other styles of e-learning. For instance, MIT, Harvard, Yale, and other prestigious universities have posted entire lecture series and entire courses in video lecture format on their channels, with no fee or membership needed, in everything from Boat Design to Game Theory to Robotics. Khan Academy is also a big name in the e-learning circuit, and has over 4,000 video lectures on everything from cosmology to healthcare.

The biggest drawback to MOOCs and the e-learning movement as a whole, is the lack of interaction. Services like Coursera have gone to great lengths to promote peer to peer activity, especially with respect to group discussions, but the convenience of online learning is also its Achilles heel. Despite your most valiant prayers and efforts, you can’t turn off and walk away from that Molecular Genetics lab, or your “dull-as-dishwater” Macroeconomics lecture.

MOOCs are easy come, easy go. You can sign up for as many as you please, but for the moment, your commitment is entirely up to you. This argument could also be said for traditional, brick-and-mortar post-secondary schools, but the repercussions are much heavier on that end. Free to sign up also means free to drop.

But whether you’re eagerly awaiting high school graduation, want to brush up on your organic chemistry, or just want to learn about the world around you, it’s just as easy as the click of a mouse. For an old-timer who remembers that phrase ending in “…opening up a book,” it’s a sobering reminder of the world we live in. But it is also a triumphant celebration of the drive to learn that burns within us all.

[ɪntəˈnæʃənəɫ] : "International" in ...

[ɪntəˈnæʃənəɫ] : “International” in Received Pronunciation [ɪɾ̃ɚˈnæʃɨnəɫ] : “International” in General American Vector  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A look into accents in media and their role in“neutralizing” speech.

By Lory Martinez

Have you listened to the radio lately?Well, if you have, you may have noticed that hosts all speak a certain way on air.

Listeners hear what is called, “the news accent.” See, journalists the world over are trained in this accent before broadcasting. After years of listening to radio broadcasts and noticing it,I decided to take a look at this universal “news accent.” and its origin.

In my search for an explanation on the beginnings of news accents, I found little research explaining the effects of the particular intonation journalists use on their words. I did, however, find an overwhelmingly large amount of “accent-eliminating” programs.

People seem to want to lose their original accents all together. In the UK, citizens who aren’t even employed by the British Broadcasting Corporation, download and learn BBC English accents “Received Pronunciation,” courses.

In the states, journalists like Linda Ellerbee had to work hard to eliminate their accents. She completely lost her Texan accent when she began her broadcast career. In a special on Midwestern accents, she said, “In television you’re not supposed to sound like you’re from anywhere.” Most American newscasters speak in what is known as “General American,” or “Standard American English.” ESL kids all over the world are taught this version of English because it is the clearest and easiest to understand.

According to the dialectblog.com:

Some features include

“The short-a (as in cat) is raised and diphthongized before nasal consonants. Hence man and can’t are pronounced something like IPA meən and keənt (“meh-uhn” and “keh-uhnt.”)

Rhotic, meaning the r is pronounced at the end of words like car and mother.

Words like lot and rod are pronounced with an unrounded vowel, as lɑt and ɹɑd (“laht” and “rahd”).

The diphthong in words like boat and rode is pronounced relatively back: i.e. IPA boʊt and roʊd”

Not surprisingly, the only studies that have been done on the psychological effect of accents have been on foreign accents and speaker credibility.

This, is in part because of the way the media has portrayed certain accents:

Southerners don’t want their accents to portray them as stupid because pop culture has parodied that accent to a point that people are ashamed of it.

Immigrants have been mocked for their accents for decades in every context.

New ‘yawkers’ and Californians…need I say more?

As “media people,” why do we feel this need to change our speech patterns toward “neutral?” Even, as Ms. Ellerbee seemed to allude, to sound like we aren’t from anywhere? Is it more professional? Or is it a psychologically affecting tone?

What do you guys think?

http://www.thenewsburner.com/2011/10/20/you-know-what-the-midwest-is/

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/AmericanAccents

http://dialectblog.com/2011/08/01/general-american-english/

 A look into how The Media Review does Spring Break ( Part 2)

by Lory Martinez

For those of you regular listeners and readers,  you may have noticed that The Media Review was not on air this week. We are on vacation. I spent mine in my hometown of NYC and couldn’t resist leaving a little something for you guys during our short break.

I’ve always loved  Strand Bookstore. As an English major, I’ve even written an ode to the four story building that houses eight miles of books. (It wasn’t very good). It’s one of my favorite places in New York and I stopped by one night and caught the end of a poetry reading.

Yusef Komunyakaa, former winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, and  Dan Chelotti, a famed McSweeney’s author read from their published works during the first of three readings organized by Strandbooks in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Poetry Society Chapbook Fellowship. The two sat down for a question and answer session with the audience for an hour after the reading.

Ever the ambitious journalist, I came up with a multitude of questions to ask the poets during the conference, one of which included an inquiry into their opinions on online publishing! Check it out:

Start at 54:37 for my question on Online Publishing.

Strand Bookstore in Union Square hosts events in its Rare Book Room every week.  So do check those out. They are a wonderful gift to the literary community online and in print.

by Lory Martinez

a SPECIAL edition of The Media Review in which I interviewed two Tumblr poets to get an inside look at the online literary world and its growing community. Tune in at 4 to hear it!

Full interviews will be posted later tonight!

Cody Gohl, a senior at Middlebury whose prose essays have been published on Thought Catalog and whose works have been quoted on the #codygohl tag on tumblr and at goodreads.com

Sam Riedel is a WHRW alum who graduated and moved to NYC to making it in the literary world. He freelances and works at a publishing company.  His book “The Shapeshifter” can be found at his tumblr page.You can find him on various sites, but all his stories are on contently.com 

Topics include: The Dead Poet’s Society, feedback, the possible metaphorical life-raft on which the future of poetry lies, Micropoetry, twitter poetry, English majors, future plans and advice for  other aspiring writers…

Special thanks to all those who helped edit these two interviews. Merci bien!