Archives for posts with tag: Facebook

A look into the growing trend towards online tv channels

By Lory Martinez

YOUTUBE TV

Youtube, a site whose content varies from cat videos to educational how-to clips, will now be charging for subscriptions to some of the most exclusive channels it hosts .

This is in light of the current popularity of online streaming streaming sites such as HuluPlus and Projectfreetv.

I mean, as a college student, I might have a shared television set in my suite’s common area, but when I think about how much it’s actually used for watching TV shows, it’s kind of useless.  My suitemates and I use our TV as an external display for our laptops. I know others who use their Xboxes to stream Netflix. Even Netflix has added its own series of straight-to-online shows such as “House of Cards,” to join the growing trend toward instant web content.

It seems to be a very different world for programming these days. Gone are the days when you had to be home at exactly 8 p.m. each night to catch your favorite shows in prime-time.  Now that users can access so much of  that same content online, they don’t need their tv sets as much.

But when you can see your favorite shows and videos online, where does the revenue come from?

Enter Youtube subscriptions which allow creators of content from exclusive youtube channels of live networks like National Geographic  to expand thier audience online, at a small price.

Only time will tell if this well end up being better or worse for content creators, who could benefit or suffer from the fees to be put in place.

A look into Generation Y and its affinity for web start-ups and iced coffee

by Lory Martinez

The Startup Guys, complete with smart-phones and energy drinks.

Popular comedy site, College Humor, on the Web Start up Culture:

http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6507690/hardly-working-start-up-guys

This parody isn’t too far from the truth. Generation Y ( 18-29 -year-olds), or as they’ve come to be called, “20-somethings,” are growing up and driving the internet economy.  As such, it isn’t too uncommon to hear about a youth fresh out of college joining or even starting a  brand-new social media or technology company.

In fact, there are so many startups these days, it’s hard to keep up. Some immediately gain popularity, like Facebook and Pintrest but, all too often, others die down as quickly as it takes for a user to close out their browser.

It’s easy to make fun of these 20-somethings who have made a name for themselves through websites that range from Kloff, the app for pet-lovers to Triggermail, a personalized email site for  e-commerce. But the truth is, with all their fancy offices and user-friendly interfaces, they are a major part of the media business.

Unconventional office space: check.

Dreams that their grandparents would never have imagined having at all are now possible. In that sense, generation Y is proof positive that if given the chance, young people can create just about anything.

Related articles

A look into online profiles and how much they affect employers’ decisions in choosing new hires.

by Lory Martinez

Spring Cleaning your online presence

This week we’ve done a number of stories on online profiles. And now, as graduation and the real world fast approach, it’s time to clean up,( If you haven’t already) that online persona.  Warning: A virtual suit and tie may be required.

According to a recent study, up to 37 percent of employers check social networking sites before even considering an employee for an interview. Up to 90 percent  of employers are hiring through social networking sites such as LinkedIn, Twitter and even, Facebook.

In my recent interview with avid social media enthusiast, Jessie Rubin, we both noted that social media is who we are. As the generation that both created and produced the social media boom, we are indeed defined by our presence on the internet.  Ten years ago, email and instant messaging had only just begun to flourish, slowly collecting a kind of cyberhistory that has evolved and expanded into the myriad of platforms we use to communicate and express ourselves today.

Remember AOL instant messenger? Myspace? Remember the days of funny email addresses we made up for those accounts?

Aol Screenames circa 2002: chatingchuck, and any cat variations thereof

Now as kids grow up in this  “living yearbook” world, they have to be careful, because, in the same way an embarrassing photo from high school can come back to haunt our parents once they are found in the attic somewhere, our  “YOLO” moments can come back to bite us. And those are way easier to find.

So here are a few tips I’ve collected throughout my own years of experience with social media. Special thanks to those who have given me this professional advice and much more over the years.

How to clean up the digital you:

  • Check your privacy settings on all social platforms. Make sure you have to approve things before anyone can post them in association with you. We all ignore those emails from Facebook about updated privacy settings, but be sure to at least check your own settings
  • Google + is a useful tool. Even though a lot of people say it will never become popular in terms of social networking, you can at least help employers easily find you via Google search, and with a comprehensive profile, you can even direct them to your work.
  • Get a LinkedIn, if you don’t already have one. Even if all your connections are classmates, they will soon have jobs in the real world, just like you, and can help you later on.
  • Look through your photos you’re tagged in, make sure the photos represent the best version of you, the one that would make an employer think, “Yeah, I would definitely trust him/her with important tasks.”
  • Have a fancy profile photo or two. You should have a photo in a nice outfit  for your  job search profiles including Google + and LinkedIn. Keep it casual and fun for your other profiles, but maybe leave the beer can out, at your discretion.
  • Opinions are opinions are opinions. Yes, your opinion matters. Yes, it’s just as valid as any other. But be weary of ranting in public. The internet is vast like the ocean but it can also be as tiny as a small puritan town. Don’t be Hester Prynne. Gossip travels fast and so do viral posts, so make sure you don’t end up like this guy.
  • Don’t over-do it. Don’t go deleting your entire profile history and consider starting from scratch. Starting over is fine, but if there are no photos, or posts of you from before last week, it will be as if you never existed before last week. Don’t lose yourself, or your “digital” self in the process. It’s about cleaning up what’s there, not replacing it entirely. As the saying goes, “Work with what you’ve got.”

That’s about it folks. Have fun Spring Cleaning!

LinkedIn

LinkedIn (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A look into how LinkedIn works

Image representing LinkedIn as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

By Alex Baer

LinkedIn recently celebrated its 10th birthday last Sunday. LinkedIn, sometimes referred to as “the Facebook of networking,” allows people to network with those they have worked with before, or those they would like to work with in the future.

It also allows users to build an online resume, easily accessible to potential recruiters. There is also a premium account offered. Users can pay for a different facet of LinkedIn: Business, for business professionals, Talent for recruiters, JobSeeker for the unemployed (or the curious employed), andSales for sales professionals. There are over 200 million LinkedIn users worldwide.

In July 2011, LinkedIn launched a new feature to the website: posting job openings directly on their website, and allowing users to apply from LinkedIn, linking their LinkedIn resume to their application.

Forbes once called it  “far and away, the most advantageous social networking tool available to job seekers and business professionals today.”

But enough with all the glitz and glamour. What does the data say? Perfect data is a little hard to find, as LinkedIn hasn’t traditionally published much about hiring statistics. Let’s parse through what we can:

-Back in 2010, a report was released that found that 50% of Fortune 500 Companies use LinkedIn.

-LinkedIn gets almost six times the number of job views than Twitter, and almost 12 times that of Facebook. LinkedIn also gets more than 8 times the job applications than Facebook, and 3 times more than Twitter.

Roughly half of LinkedIn users have anywhere from 0 to 500 1st degree connections, but the average LinkedIn recruiter has around 616, and 28% of LinkedIn recruiters have over a thousand connections!

-Of recruiters who use social networks to find potential employees, 48% use only LinkedIn, but only 1% solely use Facebook or Twitter.

-Potential growth is also a factor in networking. To double one’s network on Twitter, it takes only 2.7 months, or roughly 81 days.For LinkedIn, 7.6 months. For Facebook, a whopping 33.9 months (or just under three years).

– Traditionally, the most successful job postings and hirings seem to be sales. As of August 2011, there were about 6.1 million active members on LinkedIn who identified as working in sales. Academics, administrators, engineers, and IT specialists trail in the 4 to 5 million range.

-LinkedIn does have a number of immediately obvious advantages over Facebook and Twitter; namely, no teenage-angst, there’s little spam (as users are trying to create a likable persona), no vague relationship statuses, no birthdays to remember, changes to the user interface are fluid and appealing, but, most importantly, no Pokes.

-It also would appear to lend itself very well to the newest generation of job hunters: us. Having grown up with social networking as much a part of our lives as the duck and cover method was to the Baby Boomers. Sure, for every suave, future New Yorker columnist, there are half a dozen duck-facers, but growing up with “the game” from AOL Instant Messenger to Google Plus, but we seem to have a distinct advantage over the previous generation. As we mature, we learn how to conduct ourselves in the “real world,” but we also draw upon what we have learned.

Image representing LinkedIn as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

A look into the job search of 2013

By Lory Martinez

It’s May, and with it comes the end of another semester here at Binghamton. However, that by no means signifies an end to work. Today we’ll be talking about things to keep in mind for seniors who are in the midst of the job search.

For this show, I conducted a special interview with Jessie Rubin, a graduating senior  who has done a number of internships over the course of her college career. She hopes to work in journalism after graduation and has worked for quite a few “big-name” places. I spoke with her about how much her online presence in social media affected her in her job and internship search.

Be sure to check it out at 4 pm on whrwfm.org or, if you’re in the Binghamton area, on 90.5fm Binghamton.

*Full interview will be posted later this evening.

Social Media Class

Social Media Class

A look into Social Media Majors and how they work.

by Lory Martinez

So you want to major in “Communications”, huh?

Well, you should know,  it’s more than just newspapers and blogs these days.

Several universities across the US are beginning to include “Social Media” in their approved course-load for students interested in communications.

I’m not sure how to feel about this.

I mean, it’s one thing to say you’re “proficient in social media platforms” on your resume; it’s another thing to actually have a degree in it.  It brings to mind an important question:

How do you even measure proficiency in “Social Media?” I always assumed that it consisted of  being active  on all major sites: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger,Tumblr, Yelp, Foursquare etc.

But there’s more to it. universities like Newberry College in North Carolina have taken “social media proficiency” to a whole new level. They’ve incorporated a variety of different programs into the BA in Social Media. According to Gizmodo.com, “The Social Media major [at Newberry] will be an original interdisciplinary program that will capitalize on the strengths of existing courses in Graphic Design, Communications, Business Administration, Psychology and Statistics. Four innovative courses, created specifically for the Social Media major, are also included in the curriculum.”

Considering the effect of social media on recent events in the mainstream media, it seems like the perfect time to revamp the journalism major. Ivy League universities already incorporate social media statistics in marketing courses for business majors. But those are summer courses, or six-week intensive seminars.

Creating a comprehensive major that includes all of the newest forms of communication seems logical.

However, how much can a student majoring in Social Media actually learn within a platform that is constantly changing? Because it’s so new, how many employers will take the major seriously? What do you guys think?

A look into education in 2013

by Lory Martinez

This is a classroom in 1950:

photo credit: “Leave it to Beaver

Students are all attention. Not an ebook in sight.

This is a classroom in 2013:

photo credit: collegiatetimes.com

Students “diligently” taking notes during a lecture course.

The second image looks familiar doesn’t it?

As a college student, I know this picture far too well. It’s a 300-person class. Lectures are posted on Blackboard. Attendance isn’t taken. The logic is, you can afford to tune out, minimize a mostly blank word doc, and log into Facebook.

But here’s the thing. The student pictured above might actually be doing homework. On Facebook.

Being “social-media savvy” is becoming increasingly valuable to businesses trying to expand their clientbases.

As a result, colleges across the country are beginning to recognize that incorporating this marketable skill in a degree might be the ‘biggest thing since sliced-bread’.

Here’s one of a few programs we will be discussing on this week’s The Media Review

Only on whrwfm.org

Tune in at 4p.m. Wednesday for an much-anticipated discussion on Online Learning.