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Image via CrunchBase

A look into the job search of 2013

By Lory Martinez

It’s May, and with it comes the end of another semester here at Binghamton. However, that by no means signifies an end to work. Today we’ll be talking about things to keep in mind for seniors who are in the midst of the job search.

For this show, I conducted a special interview with Jessie Rubin, a graduating senior  who has done a number of internships over the course of her college career. She hopes to work in journalism after graduation and has worked for quite a few “big-name” places. I spoke with her about how much her online presence in social media affected her in her job and internship search.

Be sure to check it out at 4 pm on whrwfm.org or, if you’re in the Binghamton area, on 90.5fm Binghamton.

*Full interview will be posted later this evening.

De facto flag for the Anonymous group. Español...

De facto flag for the Anonymous group.  nonymous (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A look into the group some are calling the “Internet Robin Hood”

by Lory Martinez

In early April, hacker group Anonymous, the so-called “internet-vigilante/digilante” group that has launched several international hacking campaigns against governments and organizations, hacked several hundred Israeli websites and a number of twitter accounts as a part of a campaign called: #OPIsrael in protest against Operation Pillar of Defense in Gaza. Their goal? To erase Israel from cyberspace.

One spokesperson for the group tweeted at an Israeli official, “It would be wise of you to expect us.” An announcement on their website said, “Stop bombing Gaza. Millions of Israelis and Palestinians are lying awake, exposed and terrified.”

In effect, no harm was done to anyone in “real life.” Even so, it made for an intriguing back- and- forth twitter war between Anonymous and Israeli officials about exactly how much damage was actually done to Israel’s cyber identity.

Weeks later, the same group launched a campaign against North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, defacing social media accounts and North Korean websites. They also propogated an image of Kim Jong Un as a pig, all over the internet. As of April 15, the group still has control over several Pyongyang Twitter accounts.

Now there is much to be said for this particular type of cyber-attack. Aside from Anonymous’ previous governmental website hacks, which border on a national security issue, these are policy protests that make a statement about the level of influence cyberspace can have, on, say, something as large and influential as a country. The threat of erasing Israel from Cyberspace caused more than just server inconveniences. These hackers are making their voices heard by typing away on a keyboard. A sign of the times? Or a cautionary tale for governments in the future?

A look into Cybersecurity in light of the most recent security breaches on Twitter

by Alex Baer

credit: pehub.com

“Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barack Obama is injured.”

It took less than half of a 140-character tweet for a mischievous hacker to send major news outlets scrambling, stocks plummeting, and just plain make a mess last Tuesday. Rest assured, the leader of the free world is alive and well, minus some on-the-job stress, the New York Stock Exchange has largely rebounded to where it was before the tweet, and the Associated Press has regained control of the account.

With that, cybersecurity is no longer a curiosity for Wired, the butt of a joke on Facebook, or the basis of a scene from a Christopher Nolan Batman movie- it’s in everyone’s mind, and its intent comes across as downright malicious. Hacking is nothing new; it took off in the early 80s, and hasn’t slowed down much since then. It certainly lends itself well to simple pranking, political activism and even high-level military operations (read up on the Stuxnet worm- which we haven’t the time for- as it’s a fascinating read!).

Attacks like the one that befell the Associated Press Twitter account, unfortunately, are starting to become more and more common. Back in May 2011, hackers took control of PBS Online, and published a report stating that Tupac had been found “alive and well” in New Zealand. British tabloid The Sun was hacked a few months later by hacker group Lulzsec; their home page read that media mogul Rupert Murdoch had been found dead of an apparent drug overdose.

The Syrian Electronic Army has claimed responsibility for the attack, tweeting from the @AP_Mobile Twitter handle that “Syrian Electronic Army was here.” The SEA also appears to have included other big media accounts in what seems to be a coordinated attack, not the least of which is British newspaper giant The Guardian. Both the Twitter account for CBS’ 60 Minutes and CBS Denver were hacked, and tweeted statements supporting the Assad regime in Syria, criticizing Obama for “trying to take away your guns” and supporting “terrorist” rebels.

Twitter has announced that they are working on a two part authentication system to solve their hacking woes, but have yet to release it to the public. In a statement released a few days ago, Twitter warns “We believe that these attacks will continue, and that news and media organizations will continue to be high value targets to hackers.” Later on in the memo, Twitter also urges its users to take necessary precautions with their cybersecurity.

Though it might just seem like a bunch of hot air, or the same BS you’ve heard many times before,  it really goes to show that

we really don’t do enough to stay safe online. No, I’m not talking about locking up your computer cabinet, or resetting every one of your passwords… though the latter might be the case if you still use “password1” to log in to Facebook. Don’t send your password to anybody online; do it in person, or with a paper trail if you need to.

Social Media Class

Social Media Class

A look into Social Media Majors and how they work.

by Lory Martinez

So you want to major in “Communications”, huh?

Well, you should know,  it’s more than just newspapers and blogs these days.

Several universities across the US are beginning to include “Social Media” in their approved course-load for students interested in communications.

I’m not sure how to feel about this.

I mean, it’s one thing to say you’re “proficient in social media platforms” on your resume; it’s another thing to actually have a degree in it.  It brings to mind an important question:

How do you even measure proficiency in “Social Media?” I always assumed that it consisted of  being active  on all major sites: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger,Tumblr, Yelp, Foursquare etc.

But there’s more to it. universities like Newberry College in North Carolina have taken “social media proficiency” to a whole new level. They’ve incorporated a variety of different programs into the BA in Social Media. According to Gizmodo.com, “The Social Media major [at Newberry] will be an original interdisciplinary program that will capitalize on the strengths of existing courses in Graphic Design, Communications, Business Administration, Psychology and Statistics. Four innovative courses, created specifically for the Social Media major, are also included in the curriculum.”

Considering the effect of social media on recent events in the mainstream media, it seems like the perfect time to revamp the journalism major. Ivy League universities already incorporate social media statistics in marketing courses for business majors. But those are summer courses, or six-week intensive seminars.

Creating a comprehensive major that includes all of the newest forms of communication seems logical.

However, how much can a student majoring in Social Media actually learn within a platform that is constantly changing? Because it’s so new, how many employers will take the major seriously? What do you guys think?

Image

A look into just how the Associated Press Twitter page was the host of one of the most retweeted posts in the short history of Twitter

By Lory Martinez

This is how we read the news in 2013: click “Refresh feed.”

It’s no surprise that when the Associated Press Twitter page was hacked this afternoon, the fake news went viral with over 4,000 retweets before it was taken down.

A number of tweets concerning a fictional white-house bombing in which the president was badly injured were posted around 1 p.m. today resulting in a temporary market plunge and a lot of tension in newsrooms across the country. 

Twitter suspended the account once it was clear the wire had been hacked.

Over 2 million people subscribe to the AP Twitter page. In what has been called the”New age of Journalism,”news organizations have used Twitter as a way to provide readers with live, up-to-the-minute information. 

The fact that people retweeted this and spread false news to the degree that the markets were affected is a frightening thing. One can imagine what would have happened if the White House Twitter page was hacked as well. We would be in chaos! People would be running around like chickens with their heads cut off. All because someone, somewhere hacked Twitter to cause mischief.

It’ll certainly be something to keep an eye on in coming years,

In the meantime I imagine books will be written about this phenomenon…”The effects of social media on the events of human history” or “The internet, and other things that almost killed us in the 2010s…” I’d  definitely read those.

Some food for thought from The Media Review.

Don’t forget to check out WHRWfm.org at 4 p.m. tomorrow for some more media chatter.

 

 

A look into education in 2013

by Lory Martinez

This is a classroom in 1950:

photo credit: “Leave it to Beaver

Students are all attention. Not an ebook in sight.

This is a classroom in 2013:

photo credit: collegiatetimes.com

Students “diligently” taking notes during a lecture course.

The second image looks familiar doesn’t it?

As a college student, I know this picture far too well. It’s a 300-person class. Lectures are posted on Blackboard. Attendance isn’t taken. The logic is, you can afford to tune out, minimize a mostly blank word doc, and log into Facebook.

But here’s the thing. The student pictured above might actually be doing homework. On Facebook.

Being “social-media savvy” is becoming increasingly valuable to businesses trying to expand their clientbases.

As a result, colleges across the country are beginning to recognize that incorporating this marketable skill in a degree might be the ‘biggest thing since sliced-bread’.

Here’s one of a few programs we will be discussing on this week’s The Media Review

Only on whrwfm.org

Tune in at 4p.m. Wednesday for an much-anticipated discussion on Online Learning.